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Posts by Alejandro Ganimian

Committed to Improving the Quality of Education

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It is an honor to announce the appointment of Alejandro Ganimian as a Non-Resident Fellow of the Education Program at the Inter-American Dialogue. The following is an interview between our Director Ariel Fiszbein (AF) and Ganimian (AG). Read more

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Should Teaching “Soft” Skills Be a Priority?

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By Alejandro Ganimian

The following article by Alejandro Ganimian was originally written for WISE ed.review, a website that offers a daily selection of cutting-edge news, fresh insights, and innovative trends in education. WISE has given The Inter-American Dialogue permission to reproduce the text on the PREAL blog. To read the original article, click here.

An interview with Paul Tough, author of How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character (Random House)

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A Little Less Evaluation, A Little More Feedback, Please…

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By Alejandro Ganimian

The following article by Alejandro Ganimian was originally written for WISE ed.review, a website that offers a daily selection of cutting-edge news, fresh insights and innovative trends in education. WISE has given The Inter-American Dialogue permission to reproduce the piece on the PREAL blog. To read the original article, click here. Read more

PREAL Publications: Working Paper on Education Policy

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We are pleased to share with you the most recent PREAL Working Paper “What  Can Latin America Learn from Rigorous Impact Evaluations of Education Policies” by Richard J. Murnane and Alejandro J. Ganimian.  The paper reviews the lessons from impact evaluations for education policy in Latin America. Read more

Even Your Children Go to a Bad School

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Each time PISA results are released, those of us who analyze them focus on the average performance of countries and, given our line of work, the most disadvantaged groups (women, rural students, and the poor). Yet the finding that never ceases to surprise my Argentine audiences is this: the most privileged students perform much worse than the public would expect.  Read more